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The Journal of American History


The Journal of American History

Welcome to the Journal of American History (JAH) online. Published four times a year by the Organization of American Historians (OAH), the JAH is the leading scholarly publication and the journal of record in American history. The JAH publishes articles, interchanges, states-of-the-field, and the OAH's yearly presidential address as well as reviews of books, digital history projects, exhibits, and movies. 

In addition to our print issues, the JAH creates a wide range of online projects, including our biannual Teaching the JAH and special projects such as "Through the Eye of Katrina," "American Faces," and "Oil in American History." Organization of American Historians (OAH) members also have access to our vast citation database, Recent Scholarship Online.

The JAH makes selected content freely available, including the "Textbooks and Teaching" section and Teaching the JAH. A selection of JAH articles, interchanges, and states-of-the-field are also freely available to the public. See individual issue pages for details.


Announcements

Past Forward: Articles from the Journal of American History

Hot off the presses! We've just received our copies of Past Forward: Articles from the Journal of American History, volumes 1 and 2. They're perfect companions for AP US history classes and for college-level surveys.

Volume 1, focusing on the period before the Civil War, includes abridged articles by Edmund Morgan, Juliana Barr, Gary Nash, Stephanie McCurry, and Walter Johnson. Volume 2, on the Civil War to the present, features pieces by Kate Masur, Eric Foner, Nancy Cott, Mae Ngai, Alice Kessler-Harris, Mary Dudziak, Heather Ann Thompson, and others.

Posted: September 15, 2016
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Brian Goldstein on Architecture, Planning, and the Black Power Movement

From our September issue, Brian Goldstein's article on "'The Search for New Forms': Black Power and the Making of the Postmodern City" is open to the public. On Process, he describes his article and its genesis. 

Posted: September 15, 2016
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Chris Rasmussen on JAH Article

In the June 2016 issue of the Journal of American History, Chris Rasmussen published the article "'This thing has ceased to be a joke': The Veterans of Future Wars and the Meanings of Political Satire in the 1930s." In a blog post at the JAH's blog Process, Rasmussen discusses how he got started on his topic as well as the pleasure of researching a satirical organization. 

Posted: July 28, 2016
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Teaching the JAH: Robert Morrissey

"Rethinking early Native American history is a difficult enterprise," Robert Morrissey argues. In the latest Teaching the Journal of American History, Robert Michael Morrissey provides a teaching supplement for his December 2015 article, "The Power of the Ecotone: Bison, Slavery, and the Rise and Fall of the Grand Village of the Kaskaskia." Morrissey includes six exercises that tackle the scarcity of primary sources from a Native American point of view. These exercises present students with interdisciplinary sources that they may not expect, such as ecological maps of biomes and soil, as well as more traditional sources like memoirs, letters, and excerpts from language dictionaries. By providing an opportunity to interact with a diverse group of documents, this teaching guide will encourage students to consider a more nuanced, demythologized history of Native Americans.

Posted: July 28, 2016
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Classic JAH Article Wins Online Tournament

On April 8, 2016 the early American history blog The Junto announced the winner of its March Madness tournament to determine the best early American history article. With over 1,000 votes cast throughout the tournament, Edmund Morgan's June 1972 Journal of American History article "Slavery and Freedom: The American Paradox" triumphed. In second place was another JAH article by Jill Lepore, "Historians Who Love Too Much."

Over at the JAH and OAH blog Process, historian Benjamin Carp reflects on Morgan's 1972 article in terms of its place in the historiography of early America and its position within Morgan's scholarly trajectory. 

Posted: May 5, 2016
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